theme description

Biomedical devices

Contact: Wouter Serdijn

Biomedical electronics, sensors, devices, signal processing, and systems
This theme covers biomedical technology, from sensors and materials to electronics, signal processing, and systems.
Some specific directions are:
  • diagnostic technology: e.g., tumor detection using SPADs, high-tesla MRI, ultrasound sensor arrays, and image formation
  • audio signal processing, in particular for improved understanding with hearing aids
  • monitoring with low power wireless technology and implantable stimulators, such as cochlear implants and neural stimulators for treatment of tinnitus.

Projects under this theme

Intelligent Catheters in Advanced Systems for Interventions (INCITE) – WP2 Imaging

Earlier recognition of cardiovascular diseases

Atrial Fibrillation FIngerPrinting: Spotting Bio-Electrical Markers to Early Recognize Atrial Fibrillation by the Use of a Bottom-Up Approach

AFFIP -- Atrial Fibrillation FIngerPrinting: Spotting Bio-Electrical Markers to Early Recognize Atrial Fibrillation by the Use o

STW and DHF project (14728). Program leader: Dr. N.M.S. de Groot (ErasmusMC), workpackage leader WP4, High Density Mapping Array: prof.dr.ir. W.A. Serdijn

InForMed

An Integrated Pilot Line for Micro-Fabricated Medical Devices

InForMed: D4 - Steering deep brain stimulation probe (Chip-in-Tip)

Dielectric enhanced MRI

Modeling and analyzing the effect of high permittivity pads in MRI imaging

Spatially Correct Multi-Microphone Noise Reduction Strategies suitable for Hearing Aids

multichannel signal processing algorithms to help hearing aid users

Sensing Devices for Organ on Chip Technology

BiopsyPen: A portable coherent tomography scanner

Three-Dimensional CMOS Photon Counting for Medical Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

SPAD technology for TOF-PET applications

Ultra-fast GSDIM super resolution microscopy using a SPAD-array camera

Visualization of nanoscopic cellular structures using nonswitchable “standard” fluorophores

MASSIVE - Autonomous Vital Sign Monitoring

In this research program, we work on electroceuticals that wirelessly receive power and wirelessly transmit vital signs like body temperature, ECG, EMG, EEG and ECoG.

REASONS – Realtime Sensing of Neural Signals

This project targets the development of a completely new readout system for measuring the so called electrically evoked compound action potential (eCAP) coming from the auditory nerve.

Sensors and Circuits on Catheters

How to bring highly miniaturized circuits, sensors and actuators to the tip of the catheters and other minimal invasive surgical instruments?

SINs - Smart Implantable Neurostimulators

In this research program we push the research and development of technology for research on and treatment of a multitude of brain disorders, a.o., tinnitus and addiction.

Smart Flexible Sensors for in-vivo Coronary Circulation Diagnostics

Combined pressure and flow sensor, so small that it can be positioned in the tip of the guide wire used in heart angioplasty surgery

Living Chip: Stretchable Multi-Electrode Array for drug screening with stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes

Stem cell derived human cardiomyocytes are used to detect cardiotoxic side effects of newly developed drugs

History

Non-Invasive High Resolution Near-Infrared Imaging for Hemodynamics Monitoring and Tumor Detection

Large high-resolution imaging sensor aimed at the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and functional imaging of the brain

Novel multimodal endoscopic probes for simultaneous PET/ultrasound imaging for image-guided interventions

Development of new, higher performance imaging techniques with multimodal capability for endoscopic procedures in diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy and in surgical oncology.

Fully Networked, Digital Components for Photon-starved Biomedical Imaging Systems

Array of single-photon detectors arranged in a network of tens of dies for application in PET imaging

News

Vasiliki Giagka elected member of the IEEE Biomedical and Life Science Circuits and SystemsTechnical Committee

At its annual meeting during the International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, Vasiliki Giagka (Section Bioelectronics) was elected member of the IEEE Biomedical and Lifescience Circuits and Systems Technical Committee.

ABN Amro gaat betalen met je ring mogelijk maken

ABN Amro claimt de eerste bank ter wereld te zijn die het mogelijk maakt om met een ring te betalen in plaats van met een pinpas. De bank experimenteert daar momenteel mee met een selecte groep van klanten. Hoeveel mensen met de ring willen betalen, is nog maar de vraag. Volgens hoogleraar bio-elektronica Wouter Serdijn hangt dat ook af van wat de ring nog meer voor functies krijgt. Item van de NOS, ook verschenen bij Finanzen en PowNed, d. 22 juni 2017.

NWO Demonstrator Grant awarded to Wouter Serdijn (Bioelectronics) and Cees-Jeroen Bes (in-Holland)

In order to develop their (patented) idea of "additive companding" for recording of neural signals on top of stimuli and artefacts, Cees-Jeroen Bes (inHolland) and Wouter Serdijn (TU Delft/Bioelectronics) successfully applied for a grant of the Dutch Science Foundation.

In de Zweedse trein kun je inchecken met een onderhuidse chip

Alleen uw hand even omhooghouden, waarna de treinconducteur die met zijn smartphone aanraakt en 'bliep': u bent ingecheckt. In Nederland is dit nog toekomstmuziek, maar in Zweden beleven treinreizigers momenteel de wereldwijde primeur in het openbaar vervoer: inchecken met een onder de huid aangebrachte microchip. Artikel in De Volkskrant en in De Morgen, d. 17 juni 2017, met een bijdrage van Wouter Serdijn

This is how we will become bionic super humans

Tech companies want to fix spinal cord injuries and make enhanced super humans that communicate through telepathy, or so Prof. Wouter Serdijn heard at a meeting this spring in Washington. There are some snags though.

Major grant for 'Organ-on-a-chip' research

The research project NOCI (Netherlands Organ-on-Chip Initiative) has been awarded a prestigious NWO Gravitation subsidy (Zwaartekracht premie) of 18.8 million euros. The program is led by Christine Mummery, Professor of Developmental Biology at the LUMC and UT, and involves five other renowned scientists: Michel Ferrari (neurologist, LUMC), Albert van den Berg (nanotechnologist, UT), Hans Clevers (cell biologist, Hubrecht Institute), Cisca Wijmenga (human geneticist, UMCG) and Lina Sarro (nanotechnologist, TU Delft), all linked to the organ-on-chip consortium Human Organ and Disease Model Technologies (hDMT).