introduction

Welcome to the website of the Department of Microelectronics at TU Delft.

With a staff of about 30 fte faculty and over 180 fte scientific staff, the Department of Microelectronics combines the expertise of 7 research groups in Electrical Engineering. The complete field of electronics is covered, including signal processing, radar, and telecommunication.

Microelectronics is fundamentally a multi-disciplinary field of research, exploring the physics, materials and chemistry required to make devices work. It is also multidisciplinary with regard to its wide variety of applications, as it plays a crucial role in all fields of innovation, ranging from advanced health care to telecommunications and smart grids. The ever-increasing demand for processing power, sensing capabilities and miniaturisation makes microelectronics a highly innovative research field.

Research

Research at the Department of Microelectronics focuses on three areas:
  • Biomedical devices - from materials to systems, with specific expertise in:
    • diagnostic technology : visualization and tumor detection, high-Tesla MRI, ultrasound arrays and other sensors
    • monitoring with low power wireless technology and implantable stimulators, such as cochlear implants and neural stimulators for treatment of tinnitus;
  • Wireless communication - from devices to systems:
    • energy-efficient electronics
    • scaling of frequencies from GHz to THz - with the promise of Gb/s wireless networks
    • advanced signal processing , such as 'cognitive radio ', use of large antenna arrays
    • communication for localization and control
    • underwater RF and acoustic communication
    • LED communication;
  • Industrial and environmental multi-sensor sensing - from material to systems:
    • microwave vision
    • distributed sensor systems for environment monitoring
    • large sensor arrays and applications in security and radio astronomy
    • resource management in distributed sensing systems

The Department provides expertise for each of these research areas, throughout the whole system chain, from the technology layer to the sub -system and component layer and to the system layer, with a direct link to the challenges facing today's society.

Education

The Department is involved in several MSc tracks: MSc Microelectronics, MSc Telecommunication and Sensing Systems, MSc Signals and Systems.

News

Vasiliki Giagka elected member of the IEEE Biomedical and Life Science Circuits and SystemsTechnical Committee

At its annual meeting during the International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, Vasiliki Giagka (Section Bioelectronics) was elected member of the IEEE Biomedical and Lifescience Circuits and Systems Technical Committee.

ABN Amro gaat betalen met je ring mogelijk maken

ABN Amro claimt de eerste bank ter wereld te zijn die het mogelijk maakt om met een ring te betalen in plaats van met een pinpas. De bank experimenteert daar momenteel mee met een selecte groep van klanten. Hoeveel mensen met de ring willen betalen, is nog maar de vraag. Volgens hoogleraar bio-elektronica Wouter Serdijn hangt dat ook af van wat de ring nog meer voor functies krijgt. Item van de NOS, ook verschenen bij Finanzen en PowNed, d. 22 juni 2017.

NWO Demonstrator Grant awarded to Wouter Serdijn (Bioelectronics) and Cees-Jeroen Bes (in-Holland)

In order to develop their (patented) idea of "additive companding" for recording of neural signals on top of stimuli and artefacts, Cees-Jeroen Bes (inHolland) and Wouter Serdijn (TU Delft/Bioelectronics) successfully applied for a grant of the Dutch Science Foundation.

In de Zweedse trein kun je inchecken met een onderhuidse chip

Alleen uw hand even omhooghouden, waarna de treinconducteur die met zijn smartphone aanraakt en 'bliep': u bent ingecheckt. In Nederland is dit nog toekomstmuziek, maar in Zweden beleven treinreizigers momenteel de wereldwijde primeur in het openbaar vervoer: inchecken met een onder de huid aangebrachte microchip. Artikel in De Volkskrant en in De Morgen, d. 17 juni 2017, met een bijdrage van Wouter Serdijn

Best Student Paper Award at the RIFC Symposium for Milad Mehrpoo (ELCA Group)

At the 2017 RFIC Symposium that was held on 4-6 June 2017 in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, Milad Mehrpoo received the RFIC 2017 best student paper awards.

This is how we will become bionic super humans

Tech companies want to fix spinal cord injuries and make enhanced super humans that communicate through telepathy, or so Prof. Wouter Serdijn heard at a meeting this spring in Washington. There are some snags though.

Kick off meeting Integrated Cooperative Automated Vehicles (i-CAVE)

On June 6 and 7, 2017 the two days kick off meeting of the i-Cave project took place at the TU Eindhoven. This NWO research program addresses current transportation challenges regarding throughput and safety with an integrated approach to automated and cooperative driving

Best student paper award VLSI Symposium for PhD Bahman Yousefzadeh

At the 2017 VLSI Symposium, Bahman Yousefzadeh received the 2016 best student paper award! The award was for the design of a CMOS temperature sensor with record-breaking inaccuracy of less than +/-0.06 °C over a wide temperature range (-70 °C to 125 °C).

Best Student Presentation Award for Jamal Amini

2017 Symposium on Information Theory and Signal Processing in the Benelux (IEEE Benelux Chapter)

Major grant for 'Organ-on-a-chip' research

The research project NOCI (Netherlands Organ-on-Chip Initiative) has been awarded a prestigious NWO Gravitation subsidy (Zwaartekracht premie) of 18.8 million euros. The program is led by Christine Mummery, Professor of Developmental Biology at the LUMC and UT, and involves five other renowned scientists: Michel Ferrari (neurologist, LUMC), Albert van den Berg (nanotechnologist, UT), Hans Clevers (cell biologist, Hubrecht Institute), Cisca Wijmenga (human geneticist, UMCG) and Lina Sarro (nanotechnologist, TU Delft), all linked to the organ-on-chip consortium Human Organ and Disease Model Technologies (hDMT).

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