Agenda

IEEE Sensor Interfaces Meeting 2020

IEEE Sensor Interfaces Meeting 2020

Welcome to the First Edition of the IEEE Sensor Interfaces Meeting, which will take on 14 and 15 of May 2020, at Evoluon, Eindhoven, the Netherlands (https://2020.ieee-sim.org/).

This is a focused two-day event featuring 12 outstanding invited speakers from both academia and industry. The theme of the 1st day will be “Sensors for the Internet of Things,” while that of the 2nd day will be “High Performance Sensor Interfaces”. On each of the two days there will be six 40-minute talks followed by 10 minute Q&A sessions. The coffee breaks and shared lunches will offer plenty of opportunities to interact with speakers and colleagues, and to have discussions about the state-of-the-art, challenges and future trends in this most demanding area of analogue and mixed-signal system design.

We hope to see you at the Sensor Interfaces Meeting, where you will have the great opportunity to make new friends, and boost your professional career!

Stoyan Nihtianov & Kofi Makinwa

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PhD Thesis Defence

Low temperature sintering of Cu nanoparticle paste: Mechanism and applications

Boyao Zhang

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Smart Sensor Systems

Smart Sensor Systems 2020

This course addresses the design and development of smart sensor systems. After a general overview, various key aspects of sensor systems are discussed: measurement and calibration techniques, the design of precision sensor interfaces, analog-to-digital conversion techniques, and sensing principles for the measurement of magnetic fields, temperature, capacitance, acceleration and rotation. The state-of-the-art smart sensor systems covered by the course include smart magnetic-field sensors, smart temperature sensors, physical chemosensors, multi-electrode capacitive sensors, implantable smart sensors, DNA microarrays, smart inertial sensors, smart optical microsystems and CMOS image sensors. A systematic approach towards the design of smart sensor systems is presented. The lectures are augmented by case studies and hands-on demonstrations.

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PhD Thesis Defence

Reconfigurable Range-Doppler Processing and Interference Mitigation for FMCW Radars.

Sharef Neemat

Deramping Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radars with chirp-sequence waveforms are widely used in numerous applications. The research objective behind this dissertation was to develop methods and waveforms for the operational enhancement of that class of radars. This is in the sense that there was a desire to take FMCW radars beyond their existing state of the art performance limitations, and increase their resistance to interference. To achieve these objectives, the following research questions were addressed:
Is there a way to mitigate FMCW radar interferences where the developed mitigation method restores any SNR loss due to the interference and/or the mitigation technique itself? Can the method be evaluatable in performance in the range-Doppler domain (as opposed to only in a range-profile)? Is there a way to decouple the Doppler velocity ambiguity interval -- defined by the PRF -- from parameters like the maximum operational range, range resolution, all while maintaining the same transmitted chirp-rate? Would it be possible to liberate the radar from the design/operational trade-offs associated with these parameters? Particularly in the scenario in which the PRF is to be increased for the observation of fast(er) moving targets. Is there a way to overcome the existence of the transient (fly-back) region in deramping FMCW radar beat-signals? This is in the sense that its existence limits the maximum observation time in a single sweep. Would manoeuvring it then allow the coherent chaining of beat-signals -- from multiple sweeps -- in a way that could improve the {target response function width}? {Could it also improve the SNR}? And since the beginning of a sweep and the transient region are related -- and therefore the Doppler velocity ambiguity interval is related too in de facto -- could overcoming the presence of the transient region then allow for Doppler processing PRFs that are different from the transmitted PRF?

The novelty, main results and implications of the research presented are:
• A method was developed to mitigate FMCW radar interferences. The method restored any SNR loss due to the interference, and was evaluatable in performance in the range-Doppler domain (as opposed to only in a range-profile). It was {the first ever} interference mitigation method for deramping FMCW radar receivers via {model-based} beat-signals interpolation in the time-frequency domain. It allowed the introduction of an optional linear prediction interpolation coefficients reconfigurable estimation mode for CPI processing. Coefficients are estimated for the current observation scene using a known single interference-free sweep. These coefficients are then reused for the restoration of subsequent interference-contaminated sweeps in the CPI. It was also suitable for real-time implementation, with a predictable execution delay (latency), based on FT banks and fixed-length extrapolation filters, as opposed to iterative methods relying on algorithm convergence. The evaluation of the method's performance was done in the range-Doppler domain. The aim was to additionally showcase the maintenance of the radar's coherence over a CPI after interference mitigation.
• A method was developed to decouple the Doppler ambiguity interval -- defined by the PRF -- from parameters like the maximum operational range and range resolution, all while maintaining the same transmitted chirp-rate. It was the first ever processing method for the coherent integration of frequency multiplexed chirps within one sweep/PRI -- for deramping FMCW radar in the time-frequency domain. It constructed a single fast-time slow-time matrix -- with an extended Doppler ambiguity interval, while maintaining the range resolution and CPI processing gain -- in one go. It did not use iterative algorithms with unpredictable latencies, nor requires any detection or a-priori information about the observed scene, and is applicable to very-extended targets like rain/clouds.
• A method was developed to overcome the existence of the transient (fly-back) region in FMCW radar. It was the first ever method for deramping FMCW radar sweeps coherent concatenation in the time-frequency domain. It allowed for {target response function width} improvement without transmitting additional bandwidth. It offered the ability to -- in parallel -- generate different size fast-time slow-time matrices, and allowed for Doppler processing PRFs that are different from the transmitted PRF, without compromising on the total CPI processing gain. This offered the ability to observer different unambiguous Doppler velocity intervals in one CPI.

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MSc TC Thesis Presentation

Conformal Phased Array for DISTURB

Wietse Bouwmeester

Mankind becomes ever more reliant on wireless technology like mobile communications, navigation and radar. This development has resulted in more sensitive receivers, but this increased sensitivity also has increased the susceptibility of these receivers to interference from external sources. One of these sources that is known to disrupt terrestrial communications is the Sun.

The DISTURB project aims to provide the means to observe and study interference phenomena generated by the Sun between frequencies of 10 MHz and 3 GHz. Furthermore, DISTURB stations should provide the ability to observe the Sun from sunrise to sunset, at any location in the world and thus require full hemispherical coverage.

This master thesis project is concerned with the design of a conformal phased array antenna for a novel application in radio astronomy. The goal of this project is to provide an initial conformal array design that is able to provide full hemispherical coverage in the 1500 MHz to 3 GHz band of the DISTURB project.

A quasi-spherical array of radius 1.55 metres and with 343 crossed modified bow-tie antenna elements, distributed using a novel geodesic topology, is proposed and found to satisfy DISTURB requirements in the frequency range of 1.3 to 3 GHz. Hence, the designed array is found to achieve a fractional bandwidth of 79% and therefore even exceeds the initial design goal.

Finally, the designed array is compared to a parabolic reflector antenna, resulting in an insight in the complexity of a conformal phased array antenna design and the advantages and disadvantages such a conformal phased array antenna may bring to the DISTURB project.

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